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Attachment theory as defense: What happened to infantile sexuality?

Nearly a century after the publication of “Wild Psychoanalysis” (Freud, 1910) we struggle to grasp the full scope of one of Freud’s seminal contributions and perhaps his most controversial idea, infantile sexuality. In 1905, with the publication of the Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality, we observe Freud’s theoretical shift from seduction theory to infantile sexuality as he declares the sexual as the subject of psychoanalysis. Despite this incredible discovery, in the past 50 years, our field has steadily moved away from the concept of infantile sexuality in favor of attachment as the central component in psychological development. It is argued in this paper that Freud always recognized the importance of healthy attachment as an important variable in development, but that he was i…

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Review of Desire, self, mind and the psychotherapies: Unifying psychological science and psychoanalysis.

Reviews the book, Desire, self, mind and the psychotherapies: Unifying psychological science and psychoanalysis by R. Coleman Curtis (see record 2008-14956-000). It seems that the current drumbeat of attack against psychoanalysis and its contributions has, as Paul Stepansky (2009) states, put psychoanalysis “at the margins.” It is this question that has become the sine qua non. And it is this question that R. Coleman Curtis attempts to answer in her new book. For many years, Curtis has dedicated her work to the integration of psychoanalysis with other disciplines within psychology and psychotherapy. In her book, Curtis hypothesizes that advances in psychoanalysis and in the broader field of psychology make it possible to achieve common ground between disciplines. The goal of integratio…

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“The relationship between personality organization, reflective functioning, and psychiatric classification in borderline personality disorder”: Correction to Fischer-Kern et al. (2010).

Reports an error in “The relationship between personality organization, reflective functioning, and psychiatric classification in borderline personality disorder” by Fischer-Kern et al. (Psychoanalytic Psychology, 2010[Oct], Vol 27[4], 395-409). The order of authorship was printed incorrectly because of a production error. The correct order of authorship is as follows: Melitta Fischer-Kern, MD; Anna Buchheim, PhD; Susanne Hörz, PhD; Peter Schuster, MD; Stephan Doering, MD; Nestor D. Kapusta, MD; Svenja Taubner, PhD; Anna Tmej, MA; Michael Rentrop, MD; Peter Buchheim, MD; and Peter Fonagy, PhD. All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2010-22092-001.) Relationships between personality organization, reflective funct…

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