The neuropeptide oxytocin has received a lot of attention in the last decade for its effects on social cognition and behavior. Evidence has been reported across species that oxytocin may increase social approach and adaptation by reducing anxiety and stress in social interactions, shifting attention from negative to positive social cues, and increasing attractiveness and trust within partnerships or in groups (1). In human studies, oxytocin has most often been administered intranasally to a group of healthy (predominantly) male volunteers or patients with deficits in social cognition and behavior, such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, social phobia, or borderline personality disorder, who had to perform experimental tasks (e.g., assessing facial affect recognition, emotion proce…