The Psychiatry

About the Author The Psychiatry


Latest NewsPsychotherapyTreatment

Review of Desire, self, mind and the psychotherapies: Unifying psychological science and psychoanalysis.

Reviews the book, Desire, self, mind and the psychotherapies: Unifying psychological science and psychoanalysis by R. Coleman Curtis (see record 2008-14956-000). It seems that the current drumbeat of attack against psychoanalysis and its contributions has, as Paul Stepansky (2009) states, put psychoanalysis “at the margins.” It is this question that has become the sine qua non. And it is this question that R. Coleman Curtis attempts to answer in her new book. For many years, Curtis has dedicated her work to the integration of psychoanalysis with other disciplines within psychology and psychotherapy. In her book, Curtis hypothesizes that advances in psychoanalysis and in the broader field of psychology make it possible to achieve common ground between disciplines. The goal of integratio…

Read more 0 Comments
Latest NewsPsychotherapyTreatment

Attachment theory as defense: What happened to infantile sexuality?

Nearly a century after the publication of “Wild Psychoanalysis” (Freud, 1910) we struggle to grasp the full scope of one of Freud’s seminal contributions and perhaps his most controversial idea, infantile sexuality. In 1905, with the publication of the Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality, we observe Freud’s theoretical shift from seduction theory to infantile sexuality as he declares the sexual as the subject of psychoanalysis. Despite this incredible discovery, in the past 50 years, our field has steadily moved away from the concept of infantile sexuality in favor of attachment as the central component in psychological development. It is argued in this paper that Freud always recognized the importance of healthy attachment as an important variable in development, but that he was i…

Read more 0 Comments
Latest NewsPsychotherapyTreatment

Review of Partners in thought: Working with unformulated experience, dissociation, and enactment.

Reviews the book, Partners in thought: Working with unformulated experience, dissociation, and enactment by Donnel Stern (see record 2009-17014-000). Following Stephen Mitchell’s untimely death, Donnel Stern is rightly seen as the doyen of Relational Psychoanalysis (RP). In a series of publications he has eloquently and passionately expounded its theoretical-clinical principles in an accessible yet never oversimplified way. This latest volume, mainly a compilation of papers published over the past 10 years or so, further explicates and consolidates his earlier views (Stern, 1997). Relational Psychoanalysis (RP) is perhaps best seen as part of a dialectic, an antiphone to establishment psychoanalysis—if such a thing there still is in an increasingly pluralized world. From a relatively u…

Read more 0 Comments